Classical Writers · Pondering

Thomas Brooks: 1608-1680

Thomas Brooks (1608–1680) was an English non-conformist Puritan preacher and author. Much of what is known about Thomas Brooks has been ascertained from his writings. Born, likely to well-to-do parents, in 1608, Brooks entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge in 1625, where he was preceded by such men as Thomas Hooker, John Cotton, and Thomas Shepard. He was licensed as a preacher of the Gospel by 1640. Before that date, he appears to have spent a number of years at sea, probably as a chaplain with the fleet.

Thomas Brooks
Thomas Brooks

After the conclusion of the First English Civil War, Thomas Brooks became minister at Thomas Apostle’s, London, and was sufficiently renowned to be chosen as preacher before the House of Commons on December 26, 1648. His sermon was afterwards published under the title, ‘God’s Delight in the Progress of the Upright’, the text being Psalm 44:18: ‘Our heart is not turned back, neither have our steps declined from Thy way’. Three or four years afterwards, he transferred to St. Margaret’s, Fish-street Hill, London. 

As a writer C. H. Spurgeon said of him, ‘Brooks scatters stars with both hands, with an eagle eye of faith as well as the eagle eye of imagination’.

In 1662, he fell victim to the Act of Uniformity, but he appears to have remained in his parish and to have preached as opportunity arose. Treatises continued to flow from his pen.

Brooks’ Works:

  • Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices, Banner of Truth Trust, Edinburgh (Puritan Paperbacks), first published 1652
  • The Secret Key to Heaven: The Vital Importance of Private Prayer, Banner of Truth Trust, Edinburgh (Puritan Paperbacks), first published as ‘The Privie Key of Heaven’ 1665
  • Heaven on Earth: A Treatise on Christian Assurance, Banner of Truth Trust (Puritan Paperbacks), first published 1654
  • A Mute Christian Under the Rod by Thomas Brooks, Old Paths Gospel Press, Choteau, MT USA
  • The Works of Thomas Brooks, Banner of Truth Trust
  • Smooth Stones taken from Ancient Brooks, by Thomas Brooks and C.H. Spurgeon, Banner of Truth Trust

“If the prayers of God’s children are so faint that they can not reach up as high as heaven, then God will bow the heavens and come down to their prayers.” – Thomas Brooks – 1608-1680

“Repentance is a flower that does not grow in nature’s garden. It is not in the power of man to repent at leisure. Repentance is a turning from darkness to light. It effects the sinner’s whole heart and life. It changes the heart from the power of sin unto God. Every sin strikes at the honor of God, the being of God, the glory of God, the heart of Christ, the joy of the Spirit, and the peace of man’s conscience. A truly penitent soul strikes at all sin, hates all, and will labor to crucify all.”
-Thomas Brooks

May we grow in knowledge and understanding through the words of one from long ago. May we look upon those who walked with Christ before us and know that the Christ they sought is still the same Christ Whom we too seek today in our walks. May we trust You, O Lord, each and every day. In Your Powerful Name, I pray. Amen.

Pictures 3 & last @ QuotesPub

Pictures of Old drawing of Thomas Brooks, other quotes from LibQuotes

Classical Writers · Devotionals · God's Word · Pondering

The Mover

From The Valley of Vision…

O SUPREME MOVING CAUSE, 

May I always be subordinate to thee, be dependent upon thee, be found in the path where thou dost walk, and where thy Spirit moves, take heed of estrangement from thee, of becoming insensible to thy love. 

Thou dost not move men like stones, but dost endue them with life, not to enable them to move without thee, but in submission to thee, the first mover. O Lord, I am astonished at the difference between my receivings and my deservings, between the state I am now in and my past gracelessness, between the heaven I am bound for and the hell I merit. Who made me to differ, but thee? for I was no more ready to receive Christ than were others; I could not have begun to love thee hadst thou not first loved me, or been willing unless thou hadst first made me so.

O that such a crown should fit the head of such a sinner! such high advancement be for an unfruitful person! such joys for so vile a rebel! 

Infinite wisdom cast the design of salvation into the mould of purchase and freedom; Let wrath deserved be written on the door of hell, But the free gift of grace on the gate of heaven. I know that my sufferings are the result of my sinning, but in heaven both shall cease; Grant me to attain this haven and be done with sailing, and may the gales of thy mercy blow me safely into harbour. Let thy love draw me nearer to thyself, wean me from sin, mortify me to this world, and make me ready for my departure hence. Secure me by thy grace as I sail across this stormy sea.

In the Holy Name of Jesus…Amen

Valley of Vision quote @ Banner of Truth

“The Valley of Vision” A Collection of Puritan Prayers & Devotions” Edited by Arthur Bennett, The Banner of Truth Trust, 1975

Classical Writers · Devotionals · God's Word · Pondering

Classic Works Woven into Fridays

From C. H. Spurgeon’s Checque Book of Faith:

from December 27

His Kindness and Covenant
“For the mountains shall depart, and the hills be removed; but My kindness shall not depart from thee, neither shall the Covenant of My Peace be removed, saith the LORD that hath mercy on thee”   Isaiah 54:10

One of the most delightful qualities of divine love is its abiding character. The pillars of the earth may be moved out of their places, but the kindness and the covenant of our merciful Jehovah never depart from His people. How happy my soul feels in a firm belief of this inspired Decemberlaration! The year is almost over, and the years of my life are growing few, but time does not change my LORD. New lamps are taking the place of the old; perpetual change is on all things, but our LORD is the same. Force over turns the hills, but no conceivable power can affect the eternal God. Nothing in the past, the present, or the future can cause Jehovah to be unkind to me. My soul, rest in the eternal kindness of the LORD, who treats thee as one near of kin. Remember also the everlasting covenant. God is ever mindful of it–see that thou art mindful of it too. In Christ Jesus the glorious God has pledged Himself to thee to be thy God and to hold thee as one of His people. Kindness and covenant–dwell on these words as sure and lasting things which eternity itself shall not take from thee.

Father, these words are so reassuring, knowing that You are my consistent God. You are steadfast in character. You are God, the great I AM. All that You are will never change. And I hold onto You for You are my comforter and encourager. I am so grateful that You are the Anchor of my life. God, You are my delight. I am in love with You, Lord. I pray in Your Son’s Precious Name. Amen.

Each week, I want to place in this spot a beautiful and worthy piece of Christian writing from days past. Works from the likes of Charles Haddon Spurgeon, Oswald Chambers, Mrs. Charles E. Cowman (Lettie Burd Cowman), hymn writers such as William Cowper, Frances R. Havergal, Isaac Watts, plus more classic writers will be a part of these Friday posts. “The Valley of Vision,” “My Utmost for His Highest,” “Streams in the Desert,” “Flowers from a Puritan Garden,” and so many other fine books are on my book table(s). I love reading words placed on paper by Puritans, both from Colonial America and Puritanical England.

So I will spend each Friday during 2022 sharing pieces, parts, or all of a work that I have been pondering.

Photo/Graphic @ Daily Bible